Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Essay on Responding to Pain in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

Responding to Pain in Jane Eyre and round-eyed sargasso sea In both Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea, the main characters Jane and Antoinette are confront with hardships that locomote each of them in varied ways. In the passages below, the authors Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys ornament that Jane and Antoinette grew tippy of inanimate objects in response to the hurt that they had suffered in animateness. Although Jane and Antoinette turn out to use up come from painful backgrounds, each deals with her pain in a different manner, and therefore each leads a very different vitality into adulthood. Because of their change attitudes towards life and hardships, Jane and Antoinette lived very different life styles despite similarities untimely in life. ... I then sat with my maam on my human knee process the fire got low, glancing round occasionally to make sure that zilch worsened than myself haunted the shadowy room and when the ember sank to a torpid red, I undressed ha stily, tugging at knots and strings as I energy best, and sought-after(a) for shelter from cold and darkness in my crib. To this crib I constantly took my doll human beings must love something, and in the deficit of worthier objects of affection, I contrived to find a pleasure in attractive and cherishing a faded graven image, shabby as a clarification scarecrow. It puzzles me forthwith to remember with what absurd sincerity I doated on this itty-bitty toy, fractional fancying it alive and capable of sensation. I could not sleep unless it was folded in my night-gown and when it get there safe and warm, I was comparatively prosperous, believing it to be happy likewise.... --from Jane Eyre, chapter 4 ...I left a light on the guide by my bed and waited for Christophine, for I liked to see her last thing. just now she di... ..., and Jane Eyre whitethorn have had a tragic ending if she had married St. John. However, their approaches to life in response to pain determined th e outcomes of their lives. Possibly, if Antoinette had searched for love, be it in a doll or a human being, she may have pitch it. flora Cited and Consulted Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. New York Dodd, Mead & Company, 1991 Ciolkowski, Laura E.. Navigating the Wide Sargasso Sea Twentieth hundred Literature. Vol 43. 3. 1997125-140. Gates, Barbara Timm, ed. captious Essays on Charlotte Bronte. Boston G. K. Hall, 1990. Howells, Coral Ann. Jean Rhys. New York harvester Wheatsheaf. 1991. Macpherson, Pat. Reflecting on Jane Eyre. London Routledge, 1989. Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. London Penguin, 1968. Wyndham, F. Introduction. Wide Sargasso Sea. By Jean Rhys. London Penguin, 1996. 1-15. Essay on Responding to Pain in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso SeaResponding to Pain in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea In both Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea, the main characters Jane and Antoinette are faced with hardships that affect each of them in different ways. In the passages be low, the authors Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys illustrate that Jane and Antoinette grew fond of inanimate objects in response to the hurt that they had suffered in life. Although Jane and Antoinette appear to have come from painful backgrounds, each deals with her pain in a different manner, and therefore each leads a very different life into adulthood. Because of their varying attitudes towards life and hardships, Jane and Antoinette lived very different life styles despite similarities early in life. ... I then sat with my doll on my knee till the fire got low, glancing round occasionally to make sure that nothing worse than myself haunted the shadowy room and when the ember sank to a dull red, I undressed hastily, tugging at knots and strings as I might best, and sought for shelter from cold and darkness in my crib. To this crib I always took my doll human beings must love something, and in the dearth of worthier objects of affection, I contrived to find a pleasure in loving an d cherishing a faded graven image, shabby as a miniature scarecrow. It puzzles me now to remember with what absurd sincerity I doated on this little toy, half fancying it alive and capable of sensation. I could not sleep unless it was folded in my night-gown and when it lay there safe and warm, I was comparatively happy, believing it to be happy likewise.... --from Jane Eyre, chapter 4 ...I left a light on the chair by my bed and waited for Christophine, for I liked to see her last thing. But she di... ..., and Jane Eyre may have had a tragic ending if she had married St. John. However, their approaches to life in response to pain determined the outcomes of their lives. Possibly, if Antoinette had searched for love, be it in a doll or a human being, she may have found it. Works Cited and Consulted Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. New York Dodd, Mead & Company, 1991 Ciolkowski, Laura E.. Navigating the Wide Sargasso Sea Twentieth Century Literature. Vol 43. 3. 1997125-140. Gates, Bar bara Timm, ed. Critical Essays on Charlotte Bronte. Boston G. K. Hall, 1990. Howells, Coral Ann. Jean Rhys. New York Harvester Wheatsheaf. 1991. Macpherson, Pat. Reflecting on Jane Eyre. London Routledge, 1989. Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. London Penguin, 1968. Wyndham, F. Introduction. Wide Sargasso Sea. By Jean Rhys. London Penguin, 1996. 1-15.

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